Posts Tagged ‘fish pedicures’

East Meets West: Kooky Japanese products enhance American beauty culture!

Tuesday, May 18th, 2010


Western beauty ideals have undeniably influenced Japanese culture, and as a result the Japanese beauty industry has turned out some strange contraptions.  Big eye contacts promise to enlarge your pupils for the appearance of wider eyes, collagen marshmallows are a tasty alternative to painful injections, and “F Cup Cookies” claim to significantly increase a woman’s bust.

Although these products may seem a little wacky, Japanese beauty trends have begun to make an appearance in Western society.  Here are a few innovations to watch for:

shutterstock_80261809Fish Pedicure: If the thought of fish nibbling on your toes gives you the creeps, this spa procedure may not be for you.  In many of their beauty treatments, the Japanese look to nature to cure and treat the body.  In this case, dunking your feet in a pool of Gama Rufa (more commonly known as “doctor fish”) results in smooth skin.  But don’t worry.  Those who have braved the experience claim that the procedure is painless and the results are unparalleled.

Nightingale Dropping Face Cream: The idea of rubbing bird feces on one’s face doesn’t appeal to most, but consider the resulting “brightened skin” promised by the product “Uguisno No Fun”.  While Western society seems to prefer peels and rubs to remove skin, the Japanese aim to protect this top layer of skin through application of this product.  While you may not want to go as far as using bird poop in place of your nightly crème, this concept of protection is something to consider.

Sun Chlorella Supplements: Sun Chlorella is a superfood consisting of dried algae packed with vitamins, minerals and proteins.  It has been used for years and supposedly encourages cell renewal for healthy, beautiful skin, hair, and nails.  Considering how many Japanese women don’t seem to age, there may be something to be said about the power of algae.

The influence of Japanese beauty products will inevitably push our own Western culture to grow and innovate.  Now is the time to begin creating!

Eyelash Perms the Latest Beauty Craze

Tuesday, December 15th, 2009


So, you got the dead skin nibbled off of your feet by fish, your eyeliner is permanently tattooed to your eyelids and we’re not even going to discuss all of strange face mask concoctions you’ve tried. What’s the next logical step on your quest toward beauty? Eyelash perms, obviously.

Eyelash perms start with rollers imported from Japan – the rollers come in around 5 different sizes depending on how curly you want your eyelashes. Each eyelash is wrapped around the roller using adhesive. Next, a diluted perm solution and a neutralizer are applied. The end result? One less step in your morning beauty regimen.

Although yesterday was the first time I came across this eyelash perm trend online, spas in the U.S. have been doing this treatment, which began in Japan, for at least a couple of years. The perm lasts around 4 to 8 weeks, which is the time it takes for your eyelashes to grow.

It should be noted that eyelash perming is not yet FDA approved, so make sure you are seeing a trained, licensed cosmetologist or esthetician if you decide to get these services. If you’ve had any experiences with eyelash perming or performed eyelash perms, let us know what you think!

Lawsuit! What’s the dish on fish pedicures?

Tuesday, December 1st, 2009

shutterstock_80261809About a year ago, there was a new trend hitting the nail salon circuit – but now, it might be in hot water: fish pedicures.

A salon in Gilbert, Arizona, which is a suburb of Phoenix, is suing the Arizona State Board of Cosmetology for overstepping its legal authority to stop fish pedicures from being offered at area salons. The board has shut down a Fish Spa where small Garra Rufa fish, or small carp, eat away dead skin from the bottom of feet.

The board claims that when exfoliation is being administrated, it’s falls under the board’s rules and regulations, which essentially is what the fish do: exfoliate feet.

The lawsuit states that the salon acknowledges that the board is entitled to regulate pedicures. But it specifically argues that having fish eat away the dead skin on a patron’s feet is not a pedicure and, therefore, outside the board’s jurisdiction.

The board claims that since the fish cannot be properly stored and sanitized, they are a health code violation. Is this going to be the new trend following the fish pedicure around? There are several states and cities that allow fish pedicures but since this is a new area of beauty treatments, it’s difficult to tell whether other cosmetology boards will follow suit.

Tell us what you think! Are fish really performing pedicures or just exfoliation? Should the beauty service fall under the rules and regulations of the board?

Fish pedicures

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2008

The doctor is in … the fish tank!

There is a new trend in pedicures, and it involves using fish to get the job done. These fish are commonly known as doctor fish. During these fish pedicures, clients soak their feet in water filled with tiny swimming carp that munch on the bottom of their feet. Sounds gross, but the trend is already popular in Turkey and some Asian countries.

How the pedicure works is the fish eat away at rough, dry spots on the bottom of your feet. Some think that this method is safer and more sanitary than using a razor to shave off the skin. So far, Virginia is the only state where this fishy pampering has popped up.

Depending on what kind of treatment you choose to receive, you can dip your feet in your own fish tank for 15 or 30 minutes. After that, it is business as usual. That is with a person performing the rest of the pedicure. Some who have had the treatment say it is the best pedicure they have ever gotten. Only time will tell if a fish tank pedicure will swing your way.

We at would love to hear any stories about the new fish pedicure treatment. Does it work or doesn’t it? Tell us!